Science Learning from Nature


We are sure seeing a lot of scientific research trying to copy nature. We see non-technology copying birds, insects, spyders, animals and MIT and AUVs-Underwater Autonomous Vehicles copying fish. And before you try to catch a Tuna for Sushi better check out what it is made of first. RoboTuna has arrived;

http://www.mit.edu/afs/athena/org/t/towtan...robotunaII.html

All this in efforts to build the AUV for the US Naval Research Group.

These vehicles can detect sea mines, guard harbors, remain dormant and then when needed do their needed duty. But think of the commercial purposes, finding the King Crabs, inspecting ice pack for navagation, monitoring fish populations, tracking whales, dolphins, finding sunken treasure, finding thermal vents at depths of 30,000 plus feet below sealevel. AUVs are also available in tethered forms which are called ROVs which can be lowerd from platforms.

Finding oil and natural gas deposits are just one of the solutions which will be relatively easy for the AUVs. And just when you thought this was the only idea of copying nature check out RoboLobster too;

http://www.onr.navy.mil/media/release_display.asp?ID=105

And RoboPike;

http://web.mit.edu/towtank/www/projects.html

In a quest for efficiency and in an attempt to learn what the organic machines have modified themselves to do to stay within niches in the environment, we can learn things which may well propel us to the innovations of the future to keep mankind on the technological edge as we take our own ideas of nature and modify them to fit our needs.

"Lance Winslow" - If you have innovative thoughts and unique perspectives, come think with Lance; www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs">www.WorldThinkTank.net/wttbbs


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